Results tagged ‘ Wild Card Wednesday ’

Wild Card Wednesday – New York Yankees

The New York Yankees are the most storied franchise in baseball history.  Just ask them.  The 2013 World Series may not seem like the World Series without them, so – with Game Six scheduled for tonight in Boston – here is a look at some of my favorite Yankee cards in my collection.

One thing that you can say about the Yankees: They have a classic uniform and they do not mess around with it.

I call this first entry: HE played for the Yankees?!

Luis Tiant? Noooooooo!

Luis Tiant? Noooooooo!

This next entry includes team photos from 1978 and 1980 in the top row, some cool Yankees in the middle row, and future managers in the bottom row:

Gaylord Perry was awesome.

Billy Martin didn’t last the season in 1978. Dick Howser managed the Yankees for one game in 1978 and the entire season in 1980.  That was all he could take.

Next are three players over two different seasons.

See. Tommy John was a player...he's not just a surgery.

See. Tommy John was a player…he’s not just a surgery.

The bottom row of Dent, Lyle, & May are all former Foxes.

The George "Doc" Medich card is fro 1975.  The back notes that he started 38 games and tossed 17 complete games in 1974.

The George “Doc” Medich card is from 1975. The back notes that he started 38 games and tossed 17 complete games in 1974.

The Yankees were really, really good from1976 through 1981.  Two of the reasons would be the two guys in this series of cards.

I don't think Reggie made contact in that 1978 card.

I don’t think Reggie made contact in that 1978 card.

I call this one…Fred Stanley was my favorite player?  Really?

Craig Nettles cards were cool.

Craig Nettles cards were cool.

Apologies for no Tater Tuesday yesterday.  Things got a little busy with the announcement of Matt Erickson’s return to the team and a few other things.  I’ll try to come up with something special for next week’s entry.

Past Wild Card Wednesdays:

New York Mets

Seattle Mariners

Toronto Blue Jays

Montreal Expos

Pittsburgh Pirates

Wild Card Wednesday – Pittsburgh Pirates

The Pittsburgh Pirates may not have made the World Series this season, but they were an exciting team to watch.  This week, a look back at my collection of Pirates cards.  They document some of the best players in Pirates history ( that I have in my car collection).  They also document some of the WORST uniforms ever…ever.

Dave Parker and Don Robinson through the years.

Those first two Don Robinson cards. No. Seriously.  That's what the Pirates wore!

Those first two Don Robinson cards. No. Seriously. That’s what the Pirates wore!

A series of the fastest runner, the nastiest pitcher, and the ottiest catcher the Pirates ever had.

Ed Ott.

How much of a head start would Ed Ott need to beat Omar Moreno in a footrace?

Hall of Famer Bert Blyleven ROCKING the all gold!  One card proves that Tim Foli and Joel Youngblood are not the same person.  A bottom row of future Major League managers and…HOLY BUCO!….Sid Bream was a Pirate!!!

And two more Mario Mendoza cards.

And two more Mario Mendoza cards.

On the right is the 1975 team card.  On the left is the 1978 card.  The uniform choice shows you how far society can fall in just three short years.  From the prospect cards: Dorian Boyland played both baseball and basketball at UW-Oshkosh and Vance Law was once considered a top prospect.

Chuck Tanner, professional manager.

Chuck Tanner, professional manager.

Rick Rhoden is thinking about two things: His mustache and his golf game.

It angers me that - in all the years of collecting cards - I only picked up two Willy Stargell cards.

It angers me that – in all the years of collecting cards – I only picked up two Willie Stargell cards.

The amazing thing about the pinstripes uniform is that it does actually make Kent Tekulve look thinner.

Al Oliver. Manny Sanguillen.

Al Oliver. Manny Sanguillen. Two of my favorites.

In closing….This is what young baseball players of the 80’s had to look up to in a fashion sense.

Is that...a...windbreaker?

Is that…a…windbreaker?

No really.

Past Wild Card Wednesdays:

New York Mets

Seattle Mariners

Toronto Blue Jays

Montreal Expos

Wild Card Wednesday – Montreal Expos

I’m going to stay north of the border this week for Wild Card Wednesday.  Since last week was Toronto, that means this week would be the Montreal Expos.

Damn. They had some really good teams.

First up, my oldest Expos card is the 1974 Chuck Taylor.  I always forget that Tony Perez was an Expo.  Judging from the look on his 1978 card, he looks like he is trying to forget being there, too.

Ray Burris and Randy Lerch both played with the Brewers.  Ken Macha…well, you know.

CHUCK TAYLOR!

CHUCK TAYLOR!

Terry Francona as an Expo. Three years of Gary Carter cards. Plus, look at future MWL pitching coach Gary Lucas!

GARY LUCAS!

GARY LUCAS!

I believe that I have 75 other Del Unser cards, mostly from his time with the Phillies.  The Woodie Fryman card in the top row is from 1976…You know, for the mid-70’s the Expos home jerseys have held up pretty well.

Look at that Tim Blackwell mustache!

Look at that Tim Blackwell mustache!

Every year…even towards the end when I only picked up a few packs…I apparently received a Chris Speier card.  You know how last week, I mentioned the outfield of the mid-80’s Toronto Blue Jays was: Llyod Moseby, Jesse Barfield, and George Bell?  The Expos outfield in the late 70’s was Warren Cromartie, Ellis Valentine, and Andre Dawson.  That outfield in Montreal was really, really outstanding!

Larry Parrish beard!

Larry Parrish beard!

Speaking of Andre Dawson, that would be his 1981 Fleer Card.  He looks like someone is about to tell him that Rick Monday is going to hit a home run to beat the Expos in the 1981 NLCS.

Bill Lee:

Bill Lee: Montreal’s the same as Boston.  Except the working people speak French.  After a game I shoot pool with ‘em or sit in the beer garden. They’re fatherly-like. They pat you on the head and shake your hand, real tactile and friendly-feeling.

Gene Mauch as the manager of that 1975 Expos team.  I can’t tell if they took that photo at Jarry Park or Spring Training.  The 1978 team photo looks like Olympic Stadium…maybe.  The stylized “D” on the hat of Jerry Fry and Scott Sanderson stands for Denver as in the Denver Bears, the American Association affiliate of the Expos from 1976-1981.

To me, Dick Williams is what the ideal manager would look like.  Look at Wilford Brimley in 'The Natural' and you'll see Dick Williams.

To me, Dick Williams is what the ideal manager would look like. Look at Wilford Brimley in ‘The Natural’ and you’ll see Dick Williams.

Past Wild Card Wednesday’s:

New York Mets

Seattle Mariners

Toronto Blue Jays

Wild Card Wednesday – Toronto Blue Jays

Since I went with the Seattle Mariners last week, the Toronto Blue Jays seemed like the most obvious team to go with next on Wild Card Wednesday.  Obvious because the Mariners and Blue Jays both started as Major League Teams in 1977.
Let’s take a look:

First up, the cheerful face of Bobby Cox from his 1985 card.  The 1978 Doug Rader card is included for two reasons.  1.) His final MLB season was in 1977, the Blue Jays released him in Spring Training of 1978.  2.) The Red Rooster became an MLB manager for three different teams:  Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox (Two games as an interim manager after TLR was fired in 1986), and the California Angels.  The ’81 and ’78 team photos are included along with the prospects from 1979.

Soooo....Victor.....Did you get enough tobacco in before the photo shoot?

Soooo….Victor…..Did you get enough tobacco in before the photo shoot?

All of the players below would be Milwaukee Brewers at some point in their careers.  Vuke without the Fu Manchu just looks…wrong.  Roy Howell without the beard….eh.  I have no strong opinion one way or the other.

Don't ask me what the "2" is for on the Howell & Vuke cards. "Mint" had no meaning to me.

Don’t ask me what the “2” is for on the Howell & Vuke cards. “Mint” had no meaning to me.

I have two cards of the Blue Jays from 1977.  One is Andy Ashby.  Bob Bailor was the first Blue Jay.  Toronto selected him from the Baltimore Orioles with their first selection of the MLB Expansion Draft in 1976.  Jesse Barfield was really good.  If I had known what fantasy baseball was in the 1980s, Jesse Barfield would have been on my team….a lot.  Otto Velez was named the American League Player of the Month in April of 1977.  He hit .442 with five homers and 18 RBI in 21 games during the first month of Toronto Blue Jays on field history. 

A few cards of the same players from different years.

A few cards of the same players from different years.

Danny Ainge played professional baseball while he was still playing college basketball for BYU.  That Fleer card from 1981 is from the same year that he did this to Notre Dame in the NCAA Tournament.  Jesse Jefferson’s cards from 1978 and 1980.  The 1980 card was his last with the Blue Jays.  Jefferson was claimed by the Pittsburgh Pirates off waivers in September of 1980 and finished that season with the Bucs.

Danny. Ainge.

Danny. Ainge.

I really don’t know how I wound up with Jim Clancy in four different seasons.  Luck of the draw.  Judging by his smile in the three posed cards, he apparently enjoyed his time in Toronto.  Alfredo Griffin’s final game in the major leagues ended in an amazing way.  He was on-deck in Game Six of the 1993 World Series when Joe Carter did this.  Nice way to go out.

Clancy made his MLB debut with the Blue Jays on July 26, 1977.

Clancy made his MLB debut with the Blue Jays on July 26, 1977.

Ron Fairly, who also played for the Montreal Expos, did not play for Toronto in 1978, the year of the card.  The other Blue Jays card I have from 1977 is Dave McKay.  The Cecil Fielder card is from 1986, his first full season in the major leagues.  I have four Jim Clancy cards and only one Dave Steib card.  Lloyd Moseby was the second overall pick in the 1978 draft.  He would be part of this Mid-80’s Blue Jays outfield: Moseby, Barfield, and George Bell. The Blue Jays from 1984-1993 were a fun team to watch and Moseby was there through 1989.  John Mayberry will always be a Kansas City Royal to me.

Dave Steib don't wear hats.

Dave Steib don’t wear hats.

Past Wild Card Wednesday’s:

New York Mets

Seattle Mariners

Wild Card Wednesday – Seattle Mariners

Welcome to Wild Card Wednesday on Rattler Radio.

This is a weekly feature with a look at some of my favorites in my Baseball Card Collection. Keep in mind that this collection is from about 1971 through 1986 or so and I do not have a complete collection.

The Seattle Mariners came into being in 1977. Let’s take a look at what I found.

Let’s start with two future broadcasters.  Joe Simpson and Tom Paciorek.  I would guess that playing on these Mariners teams would give players some stories to t…My GOD! Look at Simpson’s road uniform in that Fleer card from 1981 on the left!  Those are HIDEOUS!  I can’t even use the excuse, “Well, it was the 80’s.”  Also, note that Paciorek’s position progression goes: OF, OF/DH, OF/1B.

Paciorek even has a microphone in his last card.  That's called foreshadowing.

Paciorek even has a microphone in his last card. That’s called foreshadowing.

Speaking of progressions, Check out Dan Meyer’s cards on the bottom row.  He goes from posing with the bat to a close-up to not even bothering to get off the bench.   Bruce Botche is not to be confused with Bruce Bochy.  Also, Julio Cruz is the MAN!  His first card is from 1978 in the series is from 1978.  He stole a career high 59 bases that season.  I notice another shot with a BP cage for Cruz in the 1981 TOPPS card.  Looking at the background, it looks like old Tigers Stadium.

Three players over three different years.

This is what playing three seasons in the early 80’s for the Mariners did to you.

The Prospect cards are from 1979 and 1982.  Maury Wills was a manager…Remember that?  You know how most teams take their team photo on the field with the scoreboard or the stands in the background?  The 1978 Seattle Mariners took their team photo in the parking lot of the Kingdome.  The parking lot.

The pitcher with the name cut off the is Dick Pole.  That card is also from 1978, his final season in the majors.  Pole, a product of Northern Michigan University in Marquette, MI, would go on to be a pitching coach for for many MLB teams.  Read more about him at his BR-Bullpen Page.

Darrell Johnson is thinking about Game 7 of the '75 World Series.

Darrell Johnson is thinking about Game 7 of the ’75 World Series.

Leroy Stanton is the only Mariners card I have from 1977.  You would think TOPPS would have loaded up on the ’77 Mariners in their single packs.  Larry Cox and Ted Cox were both on the 1981 Mariners.  They are not related.

Do NOT call it the Mendoza Line around him,

Do NOT call it the Mendoza Line around him,

Fleer’s 1981 cards with Floyd Bannister and Larry Milbourne were taken at Fenway, right?  Milbourne’s 1978 card is from Yankee Stadium.

The Richie Zisk card on the top row was improperly cut at the TOPPS factory. I want a new one.

The Richie Zisk card on the top row was improperly cut at the TOPPS factory. I want a new one.

To me most of these players would be better known with teams other than Seattle.  Henderson and Owen with the Red Sox. Phelps with the Yankees and A’s (He was the guy who broke up Brian Holman’s perfect game in the 9th inning as a member of the Athletics).  Tom House with the Rangers and Langston as the guy who got traded to the Expos for Randy Johnson 1989 and threw the seven innings of a no-hitter for the Angels against the Mariners in 1990.

But, Alvin Davis….The card is from 1985.  He hit .284 with 27 homers and 116 RBI in 1984 in his rookie season with Seattle.  He was the AL Rookie of the Year in 1984 and had a great career with Seattle.  He is in the Mariners Hall of Fame.  Heck, he was the first inductee into the Mariners Hall of Fame.

Obligatory inclusion of Ken Phelps Seinfeld reference.

Obligatory inclusion of Ken Phelps Seinfeld reference in 3…2….1….

Wild Card Wednesday – New York Mets

Welcome to Wild Card Wednesday on Rattler Radio.

This will be a weekly feature with a look at some of my favorites in my Baseball Card Collection. Keep in mind that this collection is from about 1971 through 1986 or so and I do not have a complete collection.

I wasn’t sure where to start with entry number one. I want to save the Brewers for later. I didn’t want to do alphabetical. And working through the divisions seemed like such a Baseball America thing to do.

I chose the most Mehring thing to do and picked a team out randomly….which, if it’s something I would normally do, isn’t really that random after all….

While you ponder that…. Wild Card Wednesday:

Until I went through my pack of Mets cards, I had forgotten that George Foster played for the Mets.  That Fleer card of his is from 1983.  The Rusty Staub card is also from 1983.  Ever wonder why you don’t have a Rusty Staub card from 1972-1974?  See the end of the post for the answer.  Tug McGraw is the freaking guy!  He was the Leadoff Experience guest speaker right before the start of the 2002 Timber Rattlers season.  That card is from the 1973 Ya Gotta Believe! season.  The Ron Darling and Dwight Gooden cards are from the 1985 season…which would be one year before the Mets became insufferable.

Tug McGraw and Rusty Staub!

Tug McGraw and Rusty Staub!

Bud Harrelson is obviously posing with a gigantic prop bat in that 1975 photo on the left. Derrel McKinley Harrelson – as he is known on the back of his 1975 card but not on the back of the ’76 or ’78 card – is also one of the rare men to look older after he shaves his mustache. This is evidenced by his 1978 card on the right.  I blame playing for the Mets for that long on that.   I like to think that a coach told Felix Millan, “Choke up. Choke up! Choke up!!” so often that he Millan just said, “Like this?! Fine! Is this choked up enough for you?! I’m just going to hit like this all. the. time. now.”

Those first two Felix Millan cards have got to be from the same photo shoot.

Those first two Felix Millan cards have got to be from the same photo shoot.

The Steve Henderson and Lee Mazzilli cards are from 1978 and 1980.  Henderson joined the Mets from the Reds in a trade on June 15, 1977….Hmmm, who else was in that trade…. Mazilli was the #1 pick of the Mets (14th overall) in 1973 and made his MLB debut in 1976.  That first Ron Hodges card is from 1974.  The back of that card has a note that “One of Ron’s hobbies is dancing.” That note is accompanied by a dancing baseball player wearing catching gear.  Hodges played 12 seasons for the Mets and played over 100 games in a season just once.  His second card is from the 1985 season.  Hodges played his final major league game on September 30, 1984.

Mets through the years.

Mets through the years.

This next panel features cards of managers of the Mets and players who would go on to manage in the major leagues.  I like the 1974 Yogi Berra card because it includes his coaching staff.  But, my favorite manager cards would be from the 1978 season.  That year shows the manager from his playing days along side his current photo.  Joe Torre thought the baseball cap would hide the fact that he forgot to comb his hair on picture day.  No. Seriously. Ray Knight was a major league manager. Really.  Also, Ron Gardenhire was a shortstop for Dave Johnson.  Let that sink in for a bit.

I have no idea why I would circle Yogi Berra in crayon....I was five.

I have no idea why I would circle Yogi Berra in crayon….I was five.

Check out the Mets prospects of 1979 and 1981.  The checklist for the 1982 Mets team is on the back of the Bating and Pitching Leaders card featuring Hubie Brooks and Mike Scott….Oh, Mike Scott, if only the Astros had won Game Six of the ’86 NLCS to have you pitch against the Mets in Game Seven.

Weird Al copied his look from Dwight Bernard!

For your tie-in to the Brewers here are players who either had played for the Brewers or – in the case of Ray Searage – would play for the Brewers.

What do you mean you don't remember Mark Bomback as a Brewer!?!?!?!?

What do you mean you don’t remember Mark Bomback as a Brewer!?!?!?!?

Now, to answer the question about Rusty Staub from up top…in case you didn’t google it.

During his time with the Mets, Staub had a contractual dispute with the Topps company, which was the only one producing baseball cards at the time. As a result, he did not appear in any Topps set from 1972 to 1974, even though he was a major star in Topps’ biggest market, at a time when the sets just about every one in the major leagues, from the loftiest stars to the most obscure bench player.

Back next Wednesday with a look at another team.

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